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SAN FRANCISCO: Apartment rents skyrocket in eastern gentrifying neighorhoods

As widely reported, housing in San Francisco has become prohibitively expensive — housing units routinely sell for over $1 million, and apartment rents have soared to new highs. 

According to a recent report, the median monthly rents of one-bedroom apartments in the eastern, once working-class neighborhoods have experienced the greatest increases. 

The map above indicates the most expensive months rents in June 2014, while the table shows the neighborhoods with the greatest percentage increases between 2011 and 2014. 

Bernal Heights, once a low-rent district, has seen median rents more than double in the last three years, now reaching $3,390 a month! 

Similarly, the tech-centric neighborhoods like SoMa and the Mission were among the city’s priciest in June of 2014. Only the Financial District, Castro, Civic Center, and Hayes Valley are now more expensive.

Scott McKenzie’s countercultural anthem of the 1960s proclaimed that “If you are going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair.” Nowadays, you better pack a thick checking book!

Source:  M. Stone, “Here’s a map of the San Francisco neighborhoods with the most expensive one-bedroom apartments,” Business Insider Australia,August 17, 2014. 


Eastern Mediterranean Coastline at Night
This night photograph taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) shows the location and size of cities at the east end of the Mediterranean Sea. The largest, brightest cluster is the Israeli city of Tel Aviv, a port set against the blackness of the Mediterranean Sea. Jerusalem, Israel’s capital city, and Amman, Jordan’s capital, are the next largest (with Amman’s lights having a whiter tone), followed by Beersheba.
Bright but narrow lines that snake between the cities are highways. The mostly dark areas with small towns are agricultural and pastoral areas of Israel, Sinai, Gaza, the West Bank, and Jordan. A wide, almost black zone between Jerusalem and Amman trends north-south across the right half of the image; it is the long valley that includes the Jordan River and the Dead Sea.
Click here to view an astronaut image of the same area in daylight. And read more here about a new NASA crowd-sourcing project to identify cities and towns in night images from the space station.
Astronaut photograph ISS040-E-74022 was acquired on July 22, 2014, with a Nikon D3S digital camera using an 85 millimeter lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 40 crew. It has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by M. Justin Wilkinson, Jacobs at NASA-JSC.
Instrument(s): ISS - Digital Camera

Eastern Mediterranean Coastline at Night

This night photograph taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) shows the location and size of cities at the east end of the Mediterranean Sea. The largest, brightest cluster is the Israeli city of Tel Aviv, a port set against the blackness of the Mediterranean Sea. Jerusalem, Israel’s capital city, and Amman, Jordan’s capital, are the next largest (with Amman’s lights having a whiter tone), followed by Beersheba.

Bright but narrow lines that snake between the cities are highways. The mostly dark areas with small towns are agricultural and pastoral areas of Israel, Sinai, Gaza, the West Bank, and Jordan. A wide, almost black zone between Jerusalem and Amman trends north-south across the right half of the image; it is the long valley that includes the Jordan River and the Dead Sea.

Click here to view an astronaut image of the same area in daylight. And read more here about a new NASA crowd-sourcing project to identify cities and towns in night images from the space station.

Astronaut photograph ISS040-E-74022 was acquired on July 22, 2014, with a Nikon D3S digital camera using an 85 millimeter lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 40 crew. It has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by M. Justin Wilkinson, Jacobs at NASA-JSC.

Instrument(s): ISS - Digital Camera

(via alphatree)

MAPPAMUNDI OF PIRRUS DE NOHA:  An early 15th-century European map of the world. Note the gradually expanding visions of exploration, although the margins are still largely unknown. 
Source:  J.B. Harley and David Woodward (editors), The History of Cartography: Cartography in Prehistoric, Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean, Vol. 1, 1987

MAPPAMUNDI OF PIRRUS DE NOHA:  An early 15th-century European map of the world. Note the gradually expanding visions of exploration, although the margins are still largely unknown. 

Source:  J.B. Harley and David Woodward (editors), The History of Cartography: Cartography in Prehistoric, Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean, Vol. 1, 1987

mapsontheweb:

World’s Top Ten Tourist Destinations

Rank by number of visitors in 2013:
France - 83 million (2012)
US - 69.8 million
Spain - 60.7 million
China - 55.7 million
Italy - 47.7 million
Turkey - 37.8 million
Germany - 31.5 million
UK - 31.2 million
Russia - 28.4 million
Thailand - 26.5 million

mapsontheweb:

World’s Top Ten Tourist Destinations

Rank by number of visitors in 2013:

  1. France - 83 million (2012)
  2. US - 69.8 million
  3. Spain - 60.7 million
  4. China - 55.7 million
  5. Italy - 47.7 million
  6. Turkey - 37.8 million
  7. Germany - 31.5 million
  8. UK - 31.2 million
  9. Russia - 28.4 million
  10. Thailand - 26.5 million

archatlas:

Katherine Baxter

"Katherine Baxter’s work is exquisite, whether small or large scale. Meticulous research goes into every ‘jewel’ like piece, and the pleasure she derives from producing these, is communicated to us all. There is complete mastery of the axonometric projection, as can be appreciated in her grand London and New York posters. It is, as if one is transported by hot air balloon, floating gently over all those much loved and beautifully painted landmarks.” David Driver Head of design, The Times

Love it! Her panoramic cartographies remind me of the late 19th-century urban maps — before aerial photos and GIS — which show cities and their landmarks in grand form. It is a beautiful and intuitively comprehensible perspective. Excellent!

(via an-architectural-statement)

HARLEM: Recent evolution of a cultural mecca

Recently I spent the afternoon revisiting and taking photographs of 125th Street, the main thoroughfare in Harlem. As always the energy was palpable. Note here the many street venders, often West African immigrants, who line the street in what is sometimes called “Little Senegal.” Although authorities have tried to move them for years, the savvy entrepreneurs have successfully resisted displacement from the bustling street.

Also note the world-famous Apollo Theater on 125th Street, now a major tourist attraction, which was receiving a tour bus when I walked by. Next door, a Red Lobster restaurant has opened, which reflects widespread changes along the street as large corporate franchises move into the increasingly upscale neighborhood. In the background, the landmarked Theresa Towers (formerly the Hotel Theresa, once known as “the Waldorf of Harlem”) now is an office tower. Nearby is the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building with its statue of Powell and the huge plaza for cultural facilities. A concert was underway the afternoon I was there.

I enjoyed chatting with several of the venders and passers-by about current changes in the neighborhood. As Harlem goes upscale and experiences more expensive commercial and residential prices, residents generally express ambivalence about gentrification here. Although there is widespread acceptance of the need for improvements in housing and infrastructure, long-term residents expressed concern about the impacts of changes.

While such cultural institutions as the Apollo Theater, the Studio Museum, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture thrive, long-time residents and businesses find themselves increasingly hard-pressed to afford the rising rents. Recently, for example, the venerable Lenox Lounge closed, as the new owner cannot afford a new lease. One now sees much more racial diversity in Central Harlem than a generation ago. The neighborhood is changing, raising both hopes and fears among local residents.

Photographs by B. Godfrey, August 7, 2014.

ELIZABETH I of England, attributed to Marcus Gheerhaerts, circa 1592
Gloriana in all her glory, the imposing queen spreads over a map of her possessions, showing the close association of absolute monarchy and nationalism in early modern Europe. 
The original found in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reproduced by David Woodward (editor), The History of Cartography, Volume 3: Cartography in the European Renaissance, 2007.

ELIZABETH I of England, attributed to Marcus Gheerhaerts, circa 1592

Gloriana in all her glory, the imposing queen spreads over a map of her possessions, showing the close association of absolute monarchy and nationalism in early modern Europe. 

The original found in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Reproduced by David Woodward (editor), The History of Cartography, Volume 3: Cartography in the European Renaissance, 2007.

URBAN MAPS: The Most Common Language Spoken in Each Neighborhood of NYC After English and Spanish
Excluding English and Spanish, we begin to see the incredible linguistic diversity of the city. For example, note the stronghold of French on the East side from 14th Street to 57th Street and French Creole in Brooklyn. The bastions of Chinese in the areas around Flushing and southern Brooklyn, along with the Russian in the Brighton Beach and Coney Island areas aren’t too surprising. But how about all the Yiddish, Arabic, Polish, Greek, Korean, Bengali and Italian, along with others like Mande (West Africa), Kru (Niger, Congo, Liberia), Ibo (Nigeria), Yoruba (Nigeria/Benin), Tagalog (Phillipines), and Amharic (Ethiopia)?

URBAN MAPS: The Most Common Language Spoken in Each Neighborhood of NYC After English and Spanish

Excluding English and Spanish, we begin to see the incredible linguistic diversity of the city. For example, note the stronghold of French on the East side from 14th Street to 57th Street and French Creole in Brooklyn. The bastions of Chinese in the areas around Flushing and southern Brooklyn, along with the Russian in the Brighton Beach and Coney Island areas aren’t too surprising. But how about all the Yiddish, Arabic, Polish, Greek, Korean, Bengali and Italian, along with others like Mande (West Africa), Kru (Niger, Congo, Liberia), Ibo (Nigeria), Yoruba (Nigeria/Benin), Tagalog (Phillipines), and Amharic (Ethiopia)?

thelandofmaps:

States with a smaller population than the 10 million inhabitants of Los Angeles County, the most populous US county

POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY:  What does this map say about political representation and the congressional agenda in the USA? Is it a coincidence that a congress controlled largely by rural areas and relatively less populated states embraces a largely anti-urban agenda, refusing to support public transit, health care, and social services to the degree it should? 

thelandofmaps:

States with a smaller population than the 10 million inhabitants of Los Angeles County, the most populous US county

POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY:  What does this map say about political representation and the congressional agenda in the USA? Is it a coincidence that a congress controlled largely by rural areas and relatively less populated states embraces a largely anti-urban agenda, refusing to support public transit, health care, and social services to the degree it should?